Susan G. Cosby Ronnenberg

Affiliations:

  • English |
Associate Professor/Chair
608-796-3490
MRC 541


Education:


  • B.A. in English, Hendrix College
  • M.A. in English, Southwest Missouri State University
  • Ph.D. in English, University of Oklahoma


Courses Taught:


  • Composition and the Elements of Argument
  • Composition and Literature [Mixed Signals: Gender, Miscommunication, and the
    Desire for Connection with Others]
  • Honors Writing Seminar
  • British Literature Survey I
  • Literature and the Healing Arts
  • Chaucer and his Age
  • Shakespeare
  • Renaissance and 17th Century Literature
  • Women Writers to 1700
  • History of English Language


Professional Activities and Affiliations:


  • Co-authored with Glena G. Temple “Resources for Broadening Participation in
    Undergraduate Research,” Appendices, inBroadening Participation in
    Undergraduate Research: Fostering Excellence and Enhancing the Impact
    . Eds.
    Mary K. Boyd and Jodi L. Wesemann. Washington, D.C.: Council on Undergraduate
    Research, 2009. 357-385.
  • “The Paralytic Impact of Grief on Displaced Princes: Hamlet and Oroonoko.”
    South Central Renaissance Conference. San Antonio, Texas. March 4, 2007.
  • “Weaving Interactive Learning into the Literature Classroom.” The Teaching
    Professor Conference. Atlanta, Ga. May 19, 2007.
  • "Divine Disruptions: Early Modern Female Mystics and Prophets." Workshop
    presentation coordinated with Carrie Klaus of DePauw University and Bo Karen Lee
    of Loyola College. Attending to Early Modern Women: Structures and
    Subjectivities. College Park, Md. Nov. 7, 2003.
  • Member, Society for the Study of Early Modern Women
  • Member, South Central Renaissance Association
  • Member, Sixteenth Century Studies Association
  • Member, Council on Undergraduate Research


Professional Interests:


  • English Renaissance Literature, including prose, poetry, drama, and
    non-fiction
  • Early Modern Women Writers
  • Feminist Theory, Psychoanalytic Theory
  • Madness, Melancholy, Grief, Death, and Gender in the Early Modern Period
  • Popular Culture Studies