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Academic Resource Center (ARC)

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Math Maneuvers

These math maneuvers take time and effort, but they work!

  • Read before class marking words, concepts, and examples that are not clear. Read with a pencil, paper, and calculator working out the examples in the reading. Check your progress on these with the solutions provided in the text.
  • Arrive to class early with your text, pencil, notes, and calculator ready to go.
  • Participate in class by actively taking notes, marking questions in lecture notes, and asking questions from the reading done before class.
  • Do homework problems as soon as possible after class. Some students like to re-read the text after class before beginning the homework. Get your lecture questions answered by the instructor (look for office hours on syllabus), a math specialist in the Learning Center, or a classmate.
  • Check answers to all homework, preferably every two or three problems. If you practice wrong, you may learn wrong, and you will need to unlearn the wrong way and learn the right way.
  • Find a study partner. When you are stuck, it may help to try to work with someone else. Even if you feel you are giving more help than you are getting, you will find that an excellent way to learn is by teaching others.
  • Work in the Academic Resource Center in order to access the solution manuals, the math specialists, and other students.
  • Work during drop-in homework help offered at special times in the Academic Resource Center.
  • Keep up with reading and homework daily. Math is sequential. Getting behind, even one day, tends to snowball downhill.
  • Don't get frustrated. Getting stuck is to be expected. Mark the problem, move on, and take the initiative to get help from a classmate, math specialist, or your instructor. Look at it as an opportunity to learn something new.
  • Cramming for math exams seldom works. If you have kept up with homework, marking and getting your questions answered as you go, you should almost be ready for the exam. Set aside several hours to do a mixture of problems to be covered on the exam. Be sure to check answers to insure you are practicing correctly.